Category: Uncategorized


EVERY WEEK IN Tokyo’s Ichigaya district, about three miles northeast of the bright neon lights and swarming crowds in the heart of Shibuya, a driver quietly parks a black sedan-style car outside a gray office building.

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The OilRig group maintains their persistent attacks against government entities in the Middle East region using previously identified tools and tactics. As observed in previous attack campaigns, the tools used are not an exact duplicate of the previous attack and instead is an iterative variant.

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Unit 42 researchers have been tracking Subaat, an attacker, since 2017. Recently Subaat drew our attention due to renewed targeted attack activity. Part of monitoring Subaat included realizing the actor was possibly part of a larger crew of individuals responsible for carrying out targeted attacks against worldwide governmental organizations.

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Triton Malware Triconex

Mandiant recently responded to an incident at a critical infrastructure organization where an attacker deployed malware designed to manipulate industrial safety systems. The targeted systems provided emergency shutdown capability for industrial processes. We assess with moderate confidence that the attacker was developing the capability to cause physical damage and inadvertently shutdown operations.  Continue reading

Check Point’s mobile threat research team identified a new variant of an Android malware that sends fraudulent premium SMS messages and charges users’ accounts for fake services without their knowledge. According to Google Play data, the malware infected at least 50 apps and was downloaded between 1 million and 4.2 million times before the affected apps were removed. Continue reading

Adobe has released security updates for Adobe Flash Player for Windows, Macintosh, Linux and Chrome OS. These updates address a critical type confusion vulnerability that could lead to code execution and an important security bypass vulnerability that could lead to information disclosure.

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An anonymous post on Pastebin says more leaks are possible, tagging the incident operation #LeakTheAnalyst

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Most of us who live in big cities are aware of the problems associated with big cities like polluted air, the gritty tap water, noise pollution, and so on. But we are not able to escape from all this for one reason or another. Continue reading

Test injections from the NukeBot source code

This spring, the author of the NukeBot banking Trojan published the source code of his creation. He most probably did so to restore his reputation on a number of hacker forums: earlier, he had been promoting his development so aggressively and behaving so erratically that he was eventually suspected of being a scammer. Now, three months after the source code was published, we decided to have a look at what has changed in the banking malware landscape. Continue reading

A seven-year old vulnerability in Samba—an open-source implementation of the SMB protocol used by Windows for file and printer sharing—was patched last May but continues to be exploited. According to a security advisory released by the company, the vulnerability allows a malicious actor to upload a shared library to a writable share, causing the server to load and execute it. If leveraged successfully, an attacker could open a command shell in a vulnerable device and take control of it. It affects all versions of Samba since 3.5.0. Continue reading