Category: electronics


Schematic view of a back-gated field effect transistor fabricated by UCSB researchers using monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) channel material (credit: Peter Allen, UCSB)

Researchers at UC Santa Barbara in collaboration with University of Notre Dame have demonstrated the highest reported drive current on a transistor made of a monolayer of tungsten diselenide (WSe2), a 2-dimensional atomic crystal categorized as a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD). Continue reading

Electronic components built from single molecules using chemical synthesis could pave the way for smaller, faster and more green and sustainable electronic devices. Now for the first time, a transistor made from just one molecular monolayer has been made to work where it really counts. On a computer chip. Continue reading

JVC Kenwood - RV-S1-S - Powerful sound system with built-in iPod/iPhone dock

JVC Kenwood is releasing a stylish sound system, the RV-S1-S, with a unique tube-like design. It produces powerful deep bass sounds and avoids unnecessary vibrations, utilizing 4 high-powered speakers (including 2 woofer outputs). Continue reading

Ten hospitals in Japan are set to begin testing the use of a robot known as “Robot Suit HAL” starting next month. The purpose of the test will be to determine whether use of the robot is beneficial to patients needing physical therapy to regain normal use of their legs. Continue reading

playstation3                                                      Play Station 3 game console

When Sony pulls back the curtain on the next-generation PlayStation video game console, the world will see how much the Japanese consumer electronics titan has been paying attention. Continue reading

A novel panoramic camera from Ricoh is under development and it is described as a step beyond compact and single-lens reflex (SLRs) cameras. Takaharu Asahina of the New Business Development Center, Ricoh, told DigInfo TV about the company’s concept of an omnidirectional camera prototype. The camera shoots entire 360-degree panorama images with just one pass, just one click, and can then send them over to the user’s mobile device, such as tablet or phone, via Wi-Fi. The camera has two fish-eye lenses, each covering 180 degrees. Continue reading


DARPA’s Vanishing Programmable Resources program seeks to develop electronics capable of dissolving into the environment around them when triggered to do so.

The sophisticated electronics used by warfighters in everything from radios, remote sensors and even phones can now be made at such a low cost that they are pervasive throughout the battlefield. These electronics have become necessary for operations, but it is almost impossible to track and recover every device. At the end of operations, these electronics are often found scattered across the battlefield and might be captured by the enemy and repurposed or studied to compromise DoD’s strategic technological advantage.

What if these electronics simply disappeared when no longer needed? DARPA announces the Vanishing Programmable Resources (VAPR) program with the aim of revolutionizing the state of the art in transient electronics or electronics capable of dissolving into the environment around them. Transient electronics developed under VAPR should maintain the current functionality and ruggedness of conventional electronics, but, when triggered, be able to degrade partially or completely into their surroundings. Once triggered to dissolve, these electronics would be useless to any enemy who might come across them. Continue reading

buildingelecNanodots of iron oxide were laid out in a highly ordered pattern without the use of templates. The average diameter of the particles was 25 nanometers, with regular spacing of 45 nm.

There’s hardly a moment in modern life that doesn’t involve electronic devices, whether they’re guiding you to a destination by GPS or deciding which incoming messdgets largely depends on size – namely, the ability of the industry to shrink transistors so that more can fit on ever-tinier chip surfaces.ages merit a beep, ring or vibration. But our expectation that the next shopping season will inevitably offer an upgrade to more-powerful gadgets largely depends on size – namely, the ability of the industry to shrink transistors so that more can fit on ever-tinier chip surfaces.

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Almost all computer chips use two types of transistors: one called p-type, for positive, and one called n-type, for negative. Improving the performance of the chip as a whole requires parallel improvements in both types. Continue reading

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